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SYL in partnership  with  US Lacrosse embraces the philosophy of the Positive Coaching Alliance (PCA). Please read about that Philosophy below, and look for announcements of our PCA training sessions for coaches and parents.

 

US Lacrosse proudly celebrates five years of collaboration with Positive Coaching Alliance (PCA), based out of the Stanford University Athletic Department (California). US Lacrosse and PCA have partnered in a nationwide endeavor to make lacrosse a positive, character-building experience for every athlete and to make the experience a more successful one for coaches, parents, fans and officials.

US Lacrosse and PCA share the following vision: To equip all coaches with the training and tools needed to become "Double-Goal Coaches"â„¢. Where goal#1 is striving to win; and goal #2, the more important one, is teaching life lessons via lacrosse.

We are working in partnership to make the de facto youth sports culture one in which every member of our lacrosse community ′Honors the Game′.


No matter how many excellent coaches we already have, creating a positive organizational culture requires getting all constituents in our chapter, league or school program on the same page. The US Lacrosse-PCA Partnership program is a vehicle to help fuel this positive culture. The US Lacrosse-PCA Partnership program will help us create the quality lacrosse programs we all desire, and provide every one of our athletes with a positive learning experience, while giving leaders, coaches and parent the tools and training needed to play an active role in "Honoring the Game".

PCA is an important presence within our lacrosse community and at US Lacrosse events including our annual convention (January), the US Lacrosse Youth Festivals (June), the US Lacrosse Chapter Assembly (October) and at the grassroots level within school lacrosse and youth programs nationwide. Visit the PCA website, www.PositiveCoach.org, for more information.
 

Many people talk about "sportsmanship," or what it means to be a "good sport." What does it mean to you to be a good sport? Answers to this question vary widely. Sadly, PCA has even heard stories of coaches telling their teams that if they win the Sportsmanship Award at a tournament, they will spend the entire following week conditioning! Why might a coach say this? Unfortunately, many coaches equate being a good sport with being soft or weak.

We honor the game.PCA believes the time has come to unite behind a powerful new term, "Honoring the Game." Coaches, parents, and athletes need to realize that an Honoring the Game perspective needs to replace the common win-at-all-cost perspective. If a coach and his or her team have to dishonor the game to win it, what is this victory really worth, and what sort of message is this sending young athletes?

If Honoring the Game is to become the youth sports standard, it needs a clear definition. At PCA we say that Honoring the Game goes to the "ROOTS" of positive play. Each letter in ROOTS stands for an important part of the game that we must respect. The R stands for Rules. The first O is for Opponents. The next O is for Officials. T is for Teammates, and the S is for Self.

R is for Rules
Rules allow us to keep the game fair. If we win by ignoring or violating the rules, what is the value of our victory? PCA believes that honoring the letter AND the spirit of the rule is important.

O is for Opponents
Without an opponent, there would be no competition. Rather than demeaning a strong opponent, we need to honor strong opponents because they challenge us to do our best. Athletes can be both fierce and friendly during the same competition (in one moment giving everything to get to a loose ball, and in the next moment helping an opponent up). Coaches showing respect for opposing coaches and players sets the tone for the rest of the team.

O is for Officials
Respecting officials, even when we disagree with their calls, may be the toughest part of Honoring the Game. We must remember that officials are not perfect (just like coaches, athletes and parents!). Take time to think about how to best approach an official when you want to discuss a call. What strategies do you have to keep yourself in control when you start to get upset with officials" calls? We must remember that the loss of officials (and finding enough in the first place) is a major problem in most youth sports organizations, and we can confront this problem by consistently respecting officials.

T is for Teammates
It"s easy for young athletes to think solely about their own performance, but we want athletes to realize that being part of a team requires thinking about and respecting one"s teammates. This respect needs to carry beyond the field/gym/track/pool into the classroom and social settings. Athletes need to be reminded that their conduct away from practices and games will reflect back on their teammates and the league, club, or school.

S is for Self
Athletes should be encouraged to live up to their own highest personal standard of Honoring the Game, even when their opponents are not. Athletes" respect for themselves and their own standards must come first.

Having this definition of Honoring the Game (HTG) is a start. To make Honoring the Game the youth sports standard, coaches, leaders, and parents need to discuss HTG with their athletes. Coaches need to practice it with their athletes (i.e. have players officiate at practice). And perhaps most importantly, all adults in the youth sports setting (coaches, leaders, parents, officials, and fans) need to model it. If these adults Honor the Game, the athletes will too.